EYSA provides recreational soccer for players in the area.

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2015 Fall Soccer Information

Fall Soccer 2015

Games:                Sept. 12

                                Sept. 19

                                Sept. 26

                                Oct. 3

                                Oct. 10

                                Oct. 17

                                Oct. 24

Tourneys for U10, U12, U15:                         Oct. 31-Nov. 1

Championship Game for U10, U12, U15:         Nov. 1

 

Registration:               1st Player    2nd Player     3rd Player            

Early: May 27-June 17       $75        $65           $45                        

Reg: June 18-July 15         $80       $70            $50                        

Late: July 16-Aug. 3          $90       $80           $80                        

 

Coach Meeting: Wed. Aug. 19 at 7:00 pm at the Legion

Field Set-Up : Sat. Aug. 22 at Eagle Lake; ESC field set-up TBA

Coach Discount: $25/Assistant Coach: $10

Other Info:

U8 will continue to be divided into girls’ teams and boys’ teams for Fall 2015!


by posted 05/14/2015

 

PARENT & ATHLETE CONCUSSION

INFORMATION SHEET

WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. A concussion is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that causes the head and brain to move quickly back and forth. Even a "ding," "getting your bell rung," or what seems to be a mild bump or blow to the head can be serious.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF CONCUSSION?

Signs and symptoms of concussion can show up right after the injury or may not appear or be noticed until days or weeks after the injury.

If an athlete reports one or more symptoms of concussion after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body, s/he should be kept out of play the day of the injury. The athlete should only return to play with permission from a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.

SYMPTOMS REPORTED

BY ATHLETE:

  1. Headache or "pressure" in head
  2. Nausea or vomiting
  3. Balance problems or dizziness
  4. Double or blurry vision
  5. Sensitivity to light
  6. Sensitivity to noise
  7. Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  8. Concentration or memory problems
  9. Confusion
  10. Just not "feeling right" or is "feeling down"

SIGNS OBSERVED

BY COACHING STAFF:

  1. Appears dazed or stunned
  2. Is confused about assignment or position
  3. Forgets an instruction
  4. Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  5. Moves clumsily
  6. Answers questions slowly
  7. Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  8. Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes
  9. Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  10. Can’t recall events after hit or fall

DID YOU KNOW?

  1. Most concussions occur without loss of consciousness.
  2. Athletes who have, at any point in their lives, had a concussion have an increased risk for another concussion.
  3. Young children and teens are more likely to get a concussion and take longer to recover than adults.

Rick Snyder, GovernorJames K. Haveman, Director

"IT’S BETTER TO MISS ONE GAME

THAN THE WHOLE SEASON"

CONCUSSION DANGER SIGNS

In rare cases, a dangerous blood clot may form on the brain in a person with a concussion and crowd the brain against the skull. An athlete should receive immediate medical attention if after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body s/he exhibits any of the following danger signs:

  1. One pupil larger than the other
  2. Is drowsy or cannot be awakened
  3. A headache that gets worse
  4. Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  5. Repeated vomiting or nausea
  6. Slurred speech
  7. Convulsions or seizures
  8. Cannot recognize people or places
  9. Becomes increasingly confused, restless, or agitated
  10. Has unusual behavior
  11. Loses consciousness (even a brief loss of consciousness should be taken seriously)

WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF YOU THINK YOUR ATHLETE HAS A CONCUSSION?

  1. If you suspect that an athlete has a concussion, remove the athlete from play and seek medical attention. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says s/he is symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.
  2. Rest is key to helping an athlete recover from a concussion. Exercising or activities that involve a lot of concentration, such as studying, working on the computer, and playing video games, may cause concussion symptoms to reappear or get worse. After a concussion, returning to sports and school is a gradual process that should be carefully managed and monitored by a health care professional.
  3. Remember: Concussions affect people differently. While most athletes with a concussion recover quickly and fully, some will have symptoms that last for days, or even weeks. A more serious concussion can last for months or longer.

WHY SHOULD AN ATHLETE REPORT THEIR SYMPTOMS?

If an athlete has a concussion, his/her brain needs time to heal. While an athlete’s brain is still healing, s/he is much more likely to have another concussion. Repeat concussions can increase the time it takes to recover. In rare cases, repeat concussions in young athletes can result in brain swelling or permanent damage to their brain. They can even be fatal.

STUDENT-ATHLETE NAME PRINTED

STUDENT-ATHLETE NAME SIGNED

DATE

PARENT OR GUARDIAN NAME PRINTED

PARENT OR GUARDIAN NAME SIGNED

DATE

JOIN THE CONVERSATION

www.facebook.com/CDCHeadsUp

>> WWW.CDC.GOV/CONCUSSION

TO LEARN MORE GO TO

Content Source: CDC’s Heads Up Program. Created through a grant to the CDC Foundation from the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE).


by posted 03/30/2015
Our Mission

Our Mission

The Edwardsburg Youth Soccer Association (EYSA) is a non-profit, volunteer-based organization fostering and supporting the development of organized youth soccer and providing an enjoyable soccer experience in which our youth have the opportunity to grow and develop.

EYSA is a volunteer run community organization. The goal of EYSA is to provide recreational opportunities for any child interested in soccer. There are no residency requirements.

EYSA relies on volunteers to coach, manage, and organize the league.

 EYSA Philosophy

The Edwardsburg Youth Soccer Association  primary focus is to provide a total, well-rounded and positive soccer experience for the player, coach, referee, and parent.

Enjoyment for All Children

Edwardsburg Youth Soccer Association shall be responsible for the promotion of physical health, mental and emotional growth and to develop, govern, and promote the game of soccer at all levels of age and competition.

EYSA believes that local soccer organizations play a fundamental role in the on-going evolution of soccer in the United States. We take that role seriously and will endeavor to provide quality programs and resources that move motivated players along the player-development continuum. At the same time EYSA understands that children participate in youth soccer for a variety of reasons and we have a duty to the community to offer programs that encourage, excite, and energize every player, regardless of ability.

We recognize that the most important aspect of youth sports is the opportunity to teach important life-lessons to impressionable children. All players have the opportunity to benefit from the values taught through teamwork, effort, responsibility, and commitment. EYSA understands that children learn from and are influenced by the adults involved in our organization. Accordingly we demand the highest standard of behavior from every board member, director, staff member, coach, and volunteer.

 

by posted 11/30/2014
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3/30/2015
Our Mission
11/30/2014
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